Campagnolo

Campagnolo 50th Anniversary

Campagnolo Cambio Corsa


The masterpiece of engineering, that is the Campagnolo Cambio Corsa is a dual-rod gear changing system. Since its introduction in 1946, the Cambio Corsa was an immediate success and was widely adopted in professional cycling and used by the likes of Fausto Coppi and Gino Bartali. It was a multi-gear changing system consisting of a rear-wheel quick-release lever with a mechanical extension that placed the lever itself near the bike's saddle, combined with a fork that served as a rear derailleur (without idler pulleys to take up slack), that also had a control lever near the bike saddle.

This innovation enabled cyclists to change gears while in motion by releasing the axle, moving the rear wheel slightly forward by applying tension to the chain, actuating the fork to change to a larger sprocket, and tightening the quick-release again.

 
 
 
 
 
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Campagnolo Gran Sport


The Campagnolo Gran Sport rear derailleur was Tullio Campagnolo’s brilliant application of the deforming parallelogram derailleur design. He did not invent it as there were several early designs, even one with two cables. However, Tullio just did it better than anyone else and because of that superiority, it became the professional racer’s derailleur of choice.

The Gran Sport, in principle, offered a far less crude mechanism for shifting across the rear sprockets, where the entire body of the derailleur twisted rather than simply pulling the jockey wheel into position with cable perpendicular to the cassette. It also boasted the first limit screws to restrict the movement of the derailleur beyond the scope of the cassette. All in all, the system worked faster and more accurately than derailleurs of the age. The Gran Sport was a true departure from the derailleurs of its time, and everything that’s followed has been a refinement of that original design.

Campagnolo Record


Throughout the 1950s the Campagnolo Gran Sport had enjoyed a monopoly of the parallelogram design - thanks to various, slightly obscure, patents. By the early 1960s, these patents were expiring and the derailleur market was heating up. Simplex, Huret and Gian Robert all had parallelogram designs in production, and many of these designs gave a more precise shift than the ageing Campagnolo Gran Sport.

Tullio Campagnolo was not the type to be beaten and in response developed the Campagnolo Record which was released in 1963. It was basically an updated version of the Gran Sport with an improved pulley cage with offset pulley wheels to give better chain wrap and a more constant chain gap.

Campagnolo Nuovo Record


The Campagnolo Nuovo Record was Campagnolo's third evolution of their revolutionary parallelogram derailleur design, following the brass 1963 Campagnolo Record dérailleur. The Nuovo Record was introduced to the world in 1967 and formally entered the mass market in 1968 (including some early 1967-production rear derailleurs).

It was a groupset that totally dominated the road racing scene for 16 years, an astonishing feat given that competitive sports spur on technical innovation. The Campagnolo Nuovo Record had powerful was simply ahead of its time; it was light, strongly constructed and well finished. The mechanism in which the parallelogram loads its pivots means that they do not wear as quickly as other rear-derauliers on the market at the time.

Campagnolo 50th Anniversary


The Campagnolo 50th Anniversary groupset was released to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Campagnolo in 1983. All of the pieces in the groupset are engraved with the signature of Tullio Campagnolo, and a special “50th” logo. Furthermore, most of the pieces in the groupset are marked by a raised 22 carrot gold Campagnolo logo. Every groupset is numbered and on the inside of the crank is stamped with a serial number; the lower number, the more valuable it is. Groupset #0001 was kept by Campagnolo and placed in a museum and #0002 was presented to Pope John Paul II. The first 5000 group sets sold out immediately, so another 10,000 were manufactured.

Campagnolo Delta Brakes


Introduced as part of the Campagnolo C-Record group, the Delta Brakes were a centre-pull brake with an articulated parallelogram. The mechanism was, however, hidden from view. It looked rather like an inverted diamond; as the rider braked, the cable pulled upward, which flattened the diamond and pulled the brake arms toward the rim. This geometric feature allows braking power on the brake shoes higher than the power applied to the lever. But it was aesthetics, more than performance, that really helped stoke cyclists’ desire.

The brakes weren’t officially called “Deltas” they were simply the brakes of the C-Record group. And yet their form was so unusual, so compelling, that the name for the triangular Greek letter stuck.

Campagnolo C-Record


The Campagnolo Gran Sport rear derailleur was Tullio Campagnolo’s brilliant application of the deforming parallelogram derailleur design. He did not invent it as there were several early designs, even one with two cables. However, Tullio just did it better than anyone else and because of that superiority, it became the professional racer’s derailleur of choice.

The Gran Sport, in principle, offered a far less crude mechanism for shifting across the rear sprockets, where the entire body of the derailleur twisted rather than simply pulling the jockey wheel into position with cable perpendicular to the cassette. It also boasted the first limit screws to restrict the movement of the derailleur beyond the scope of the cassette. All in all, the system worked faster and more accurately than derailleurs of the age. The Gran Sport was a true departure from the derailleurs of its time, and everything that’s followed has been a refinement of that original design.